Archives for posts with tag: S/S 2014

Payal Pratap’s S/S 2014 collection requires little explanation as the images and details speak for themselves. It was a show that all on Day#3 of WLIFW were eagerly awaiting, as over the past few seasons she has successfully built a strong following for the way she combines Indian textiles, colors, prints and embellishments. Her designs borrow from familiar Indian silhouettes, garments and styles of layering, and she understands well India’s love of mix and match as well as the need for modesty and morality in dress.

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In this collection in particular the play on primary colors (red, blue and a various versions of yellow) was fun to see and also admirable as it is not always easy to execute in a sophisticated manner. The garments were simple, and the designer’s input lay in the way they had been combined (styled, mixed and matched), the fabric choices and the details.

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While it was categorized as Spring Summer, it was perhaps more suited to spring evenings or an air-conditioned summer – if worn in the way they appeared on ramp. Taken apart, however, it is easy to see how one could dress certain items up or down, to create multiple as well as more casual looks – and indeed wear them all year round. To affirm this observation, Vogue India’s review of Payal Pratap’s S/S 2014 collection not only congratulates her on designing for the working [modern Indian] woman but also for catering to another long established Indian expectation of – paisa vasool (getting one’s money worth, bang for your buck).

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See the gallery below for more images of the collection.

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(All images are taken by me.)

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Finding ways of minimizing fashion’s waste is a growing concern for some within the fashion fraternity. Solutions range from reducing waste at the design and production stage (see Zero Waste patternmaking by Holly McQuillan and Timo Rissanen), through developing simpler and smarter packaging, promotion and retail strategies, and finally dealing with post-consumer waste – i.e. the clothes we no longer need or want as a result of fashion’s never ending cycle and mechanisms of planned obsolesence.

Aneeth Arora’s designs for her label Péro (which I will highlight in a forthcoming post on her S/S 2014 line) already have the hallmarks of “sustainable design” – her garments transcend short term fashion fads thus remaining classics in one’s wardrobe, the “love” that goes into each piece means that its possible to become emotionally attached to them, and the fabrics and crafts are ethically sourced and used. In addition, she has also come up with a simple and cute way of dealing with day-to-day fabric waste from her collections. Each doll pictured here (from her stall at this October’s Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week, WLIFW), represents one of her past collections – the leftover scraps of which make up their tiny garments. Aneeth initially used them for an installation alongside her chota (small) Péro line for kids. The dolls are labelled with the season and year that the fabrics relate to – thus making them desirable collectors items for any avid Péro follower.

 

Rohit Gandhi + Rahul Khanna WLIFW 2013

I was fortunate to be able to attend three days of WLIFW S/S 2014 (Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week) in Delhi this October (10th – 12th) – and even luckier to be able to photograph some of the collections from the media photography section (aka photographers’ pit) at the end of the catwalk. WOW! This was a once in a lifetime experience which a whole lot of fun and a great learning experience as well.

A big “thank you” to FDCI for this great opportunity!