Archives for posts with tag: October 2013

While the gorgeous colors, layers, prints and embellishments were a treat to see at Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week S/S 2014, Bodice’s minimal collection – that emphasized simplicity through subtle detailing borrowed from men’s tailoring and comfortable cuts – came across as a breath of fresh cool air.

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Some might say that minimalism sticks out like a sore thumb in Indian fashion. It is common knowledge that bridal and occasion wear accounts for the majority of popular tastes and sales in designer fashion, especially in the north. Yet, if one considers India’s design history post-independence as well as some of the crafts that have evolved here over the centuries – there is plenty of evidence of simple, subtle design existing alongside our other more maximalist tendencies.

Hailed as a key player amongst India’s emerging group of globally minded design labels as well as a proponent for the anti-glamour movement – Ruchika’s Sachdev’s Bodice offers urban fashionistas the space to rebel against fussy details and fitted OTT (over the top) fashion. However, if one goes by the experience of other more seasoned designers already in this niche simplicity can be a challenging concept to convince Indian consumers of – consumers who are often looking for a visible return for their investments (I mentioned paisa vasool in an earlier post). I noted some comments online following the show that questioned how these garments were fashion, comments that critiqued their fit and failed to see any innovation in them. Bringing minimalism back or forward, depending on how you view it, into the mainstream of fashion in India will require a cultural shift in how clothes are viewed, worn, consumed, valued etc.

I am keen to see how this space evolves.

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A more complete set of images taken by me at the show here:

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Payal Pratap’s S/S 2014 collection requires little explanation as the images and details speak for themselves. It was a show that all on Day#3 of WLIFW were eagerly awaiting, as over the past few seasons she has successfully built a strong following for the way she combines Indian textiles, colors, prints and embellishments. Her designs borrow from familiar Indian silhouettes, garments and styles of layering, and she understands well India’s love of mix and match as well as the need for modesty and morality in dress.

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In this collection in particular the play on primary colors (red, blue and a various versions of yellow) was fun to see and also admirable as it is not always easy to execute in a sophisticated manner. The garments were simple, and the designer’s input lay in the way they had been combined (styled, mixed and matched), the fabric choices and the details.

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While it was categorized as Spring Summer, it was perhaps more suited to spring evenings or an air-conditioned summer – if worn in the way they appeared on ramp. Taken apart, however, it is easy to see how one could dress certain items up or down, to create multiple as well as more casual looks – and indeed wear them all year round. To affirm this observation, Vogue India’s review of Payal Pratap’s S/S 2014 collection not only congratulates her on designing for the working [modern Indian] woman but also for catering to another long established Indian expectation of – paisa vasool (getting one’s money worth, bang for your buck).

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See the gallery below for more images of the collection.

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(All images are taken by me.)

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Finding ways of minimizing fashion’s waste is a growing concern for some within the fashion fraternity. Solutions range from reducing waste at the design and production stage (see Zero Waste patternmaking by Holly McQuillan and Timo Rissanen), through developing simpler and smarter packaging, promotion and retail strategies, and finally dealing with post-consumer waste – i.e. the clothes we no longer need or want as a result of fashion’s never ending cycle and mechanisms of planned obsolesence.

Aneeth Arora’s designs for her label Péro (which I will highlight in a forthcoming post on her S/S 2014 line) already have the hallmarks of “sustainable design” – her garments transcend short term fashion fads thus remaining classics in one’s wardrobe, the “love” that goes into each piece means that its possible to become emotionally attached to them, and the fabrics and crafts are ethically sourced and used. In addition, she has also come up with a simple and cute way of dealing with day-to-day fabric waste from her collections. Each doll pictured here (from her stall at this October’s Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week, WLIFW), represents one of her past collections – the leftover scraps of which make up their tiny garments. Aneeth initially used them for an installation alongside her chota (small) Péro line for kids. The dolls are labelled with the season and year that the fabrics relate to – thus making them desirable collectors items for any avid Péro follower.

 

Dev R Nil’s S/S 2014 collection showcase at Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week this October was refreshing – not only for the simpler cuts that this design duo from Kolkata had to offer but also due to the way they complimented their aesthetic and general sense of minimalism by opting for a straight forward catwalk format (where models did not stop and pose, but walked on and off). This was a cause of some stress in the media photo pit as photographers and bloggers grumbled audibly about missing crucial photo opportunities. Not being a professional photographer myself + sitting at the corner end of the catwalk –  I mostly caught models as they turned away from me. While not all Dev R Nil’s Spring Summer proportions were to my liking, they had some great print-on-print combinations, Art Deco inspired tile and frame prints (see the pink print outfit for men), doily lace, circular floral motif prints and Ari work, and the most beautiful handloom silk Ikat stripe. Many items in the collection looked comfortable and easy to relate to – a plus point that has earned them positive reviews.

Here is a selection of some of the side views of Dev R Nil’s S/S 2014 collection:

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Sadly, not all my photographs were side views…

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(All images are by me)

Rohit Gandhi + Rahul Khanna WLIFW 2013

I was fortunate to be able to attend three days of WLIFW S/S 2014 (Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week) in Delhi this October (10th – 12th) – and even luckier to be able to photograph some of the collections from the media photography section (aka photographers’ pit) at the end of the catwalk. WOW! This was a once in a lifetime experience which a whole lot of fun and a great learning experience as well.

A big “thank you” to FDCI for this great opportunity!